WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO CONTROL MOLE CRICKETS? by Larry Williams, UF/IFAS Extension Agent

Normal
0

<wunctuationKerning/>

false
false
false
<woNotPromoteQF/>
EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

<wontGrowAutofit/>

<wontFlipMirrorIndents/>

<woNotOptimizeForBrowser/>

Many
people panic and treat their lawn with all sorts of pesticides when they see
mole crickets in the spring or at the first sign of a brown area in their lawn.
What they don’t understand is the biology of this pest.

Mole
crickets spend the winter mostly as adults in the soil. As the weather warms in
late February and march, adult mole crickets emerge and begin to mate. During
the mating process, the male makes a chamber in the soil and chirps to attract
a female. Attracted females fly to the males. After mating, the male dies. The
mated female begins tunneling and laying eggs in the tunnels. After which, she
dies. This mating process is occurring in late evening and at night.

Insecticide
treatments during the mating and egg laying activity in spring, when mostly
adults are present, are not recommended because adults are not easily killed
and the chances of re-infestation from subsequent flights and unhatched eggs is
high.

Although
lawns can suffer some damage in spring, it’s better to mark areas of mole
cricket activity and target those areas for treatment in mid-June through July
after the eggs have all hatched and before the nymphs (immature mole crickets)
are large enough to do much damage. But don’t treat at all if there is no
evidence of mole cricket activity.

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”;}

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s